New Blacksmith Styles – Added Traction

The Blacksmith can truly be considered the classic American work shoe. In the early 1900s, when Red Wing Shoe Company first began to service rural America, this style of shoe became vastly popular across the country. Versatile and reliable, it was used in farm fields and blacksmith workshops during the day before being cleaned and shined up for a night out on the town. It was the all-purpose shoe for many
years in many industries.

With the positive momentum around the sole used on Blacksmith no. 2955 and Iron Ranger no. 8119, we updated the complete Blacksmith range featuring the 430 Mini Lug outsole. Reintroducing as the Blacksmith no. 3340, 3341, 3342, and 3343. The Mini Lug sole has been designed to showcase a smooth and refined side profile of the Blacksmith while adding traction and durability. In addition to the sole update, all Blacksmith styles now come with the classic bronze eyelets and speed hooks.

Style no. 3341 Charcoal Rough & Tough Leather
Style no. 3341 Charcoal Rough & Tough Leather

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Faces of Red Wing | Colin Spoelman

KC_6 Colin Spoelman runs the oldest distillery in New York City, Kings County Distillery. While that description may sound a bit grand for a five-year-old distillery, Spoelman is very much steeped in old whiskey culture. He grew up in Kentucky, America’s whiskey heartland, and with a healthy DIY attitude launched his Brooklyn-based whiskey brand right as the thirst for craft distilling began to take hold in the U.S., putting him, and his distillery, at the forefront of the craft spirit movement. Spoelman spends most of his time at the Brooklyn Navy Yard in a 115-year-old brick building that serves as the headquarters for King County Distillery. On a recent muggy August day the distillery was filled with the sweet smell of whiskey-soaked barrels, and it was there we caught up with Spoelman to discuss his passion for distilling and craft whiskey.

Tell us about your path into distilling, growing up in Kentucky and what that meant.
Interestingly enough my parents didn’t drink. it was a dry county, so there were no bars or liquor stores. Very different culture of alcohol. It’s very redneck and I say that in a very loving way. I grew up going to a bootlegger who was just a guy, not necessarily making moonshine, but he would go into Virginia and buy commercial alcohol and sell it to high school kids and alcoholics.
I moved to New York and would periodically go back and visit the bootleggers, and some of them did sell moonshine. And knowing that people in New York were kind of curious about that, I’d bring it back and share it with people. And that got me interested in this culture I had left, which is really a culture of a lot of homemade stuff.

Did you learn from anyone?
No, because there’s really nobody who really knows how to do it anymore. There are some old-timers in Kentucky but they don’t really like to talk about it.

It’s secretive…
Yeah, but that being said, there are books that are out there. It’s basically home-brewing and then going one step further. The science is pretty straightforward. My experience as a startup hobby distiller was: Wow this is surprisingly easy, and surprisingly easy to make stuff that is comparable or better than commercial whiskeys that are out there.
KC_5
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Faces of Red Wing | Colin Spoelman

KC_6 Colin Spoelman runs the oldest distillery in New York City, Kings County Distillery. While that description may sound a bit grand for a five-year-old distillery, Spoelman is very much steeped in old whiskey culture. He grew up in Kentucky, America’s whiskey heartland, and with a healthy DIY attitude launched his Brooklyn-based whiskey brand right as the thirst for craft distilling began to take hold in the U.S., putting him, and his distillery, at the forefront of the craft spirit movement. Spoelman spends most of his time at the Brooklyn Navy Yard in a 115-year-old brick building that serves as the headquarters for King County Distillery. On a recent muggy August day the distillery was filled with the sweet smell of whiskey-soaked barrels, and it was there we caught up with Spoelman to discuss his passion for distilling and craft whiskey.

Tell us about your path into distilling, growing up in Kentucky and what that meant.
Interestingly enough my parents didn’t drink. it was a dry county, so there were no bars or liquor stores. Very different culture of alcohol. It’s very redneck and I say that in a very loving way. I grew up going to a bootlegger who was just a guy, not necessarily making moonshine, but he would go into Virginia and buy commercial alcohol and sell it to high school kids and alcoholics.
I moved to New York and would periodically go back and visit the bootleggers, and some of them did sell moonshine. And knowing that people in New York were kind of curious about that, I’d bring it back and share it with people. And that got me interested in this culture I had left, which is really a culture of a lot of homemade stuff.

Did you learn from anyone?
No, because there’s really nobody who really knows how to do it anymore. There are some old-timers in Kentucky but they don’t really like to talk about it.

It’s secretive…
Yeah, but that being said, there are books that are out there. It’s basically home-brewing and then going one step further. The science is pretty straightforward. My experience as a startup hobby distiller was: Wow this is surprisingly easy, and surprisingly easy to make stuff that is comparable or better than commercial whiskeys that are out there.
KC_5
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How to take care of your Red Wing Roughout leather boots

Red Wing Roughout leather is created using a reverse-suede technique. While most tanneries split, thin and weaken the hide to create the rough suede surface, we simply use the other side of the hide. By doing so, we avoid splitting or thinning our full-grain hides. This makes our Roughout leather just as strong and durable as our other leathers. Or visit our shoecare instructions page here.

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Faces of Red Wing | Mark Parr

“I was working with a woodsman when I was younger and I saw him cut his own finger off”. Mark explains whilst holding an instrument far more than capable of a similar occurrence. The London Log Company are a loose collective of individuals scattered through the city to the rolling countryside. Established in 2006 they’re an independent British company that provides wood and charcoal to the industries in the UK. They make the largest range of single species charcoals in Europe. Their central residence is a small two-door workshop in South East London, filled with paper and hessian sacks of different types of wood and boxes full of charcoal. Apple wood, English Plum and Oak to name just a few, all ticketed and labeled from origin to its then concluding destination.

IMG_0937_blogWe were lucky enough to get invited to their yard in Hertfordshire with company owner Mark, a visual array of old machinery, tools, burners and of course wood. A workman’s playground and photographers paradise, here is where much of the charcoal is made and a huge portion of wood is stored. Magnificent chaotic hills of used wood and chippings, ‘jenga’ like stacks of oak and silver birch glisten, towering over us as we make our way round what used to be a functioning pig farm. Lewis, who manages production on the site is maneuvering charcoal from the retort in an old pick up and sealing bags ready for the road as we gaze in awe at his effortless workmanship. The retort is a double-barreled steel oxygen-less sealed flask where the volatile elements are driven off by heat, leaving a high grade fixed carbon charcoal. “Part science, part alchemy and a lot of craft.”

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